City school celebrates 5th year of Model School status

  Students at Woodland Hills Elementary perform "Oklahoma!" as part of a celebration of the school’s fifth consecutive year as a Great Expectations Model School, the program’s highest award. Great Expectations is an educational movement designed to improve schools through a focus on good character and professional development for teachers. Model School status is awarded to schools that score at least 90 percent when they are evaluated by mentors from the program, based on 17 practices characterizing the Great Expectations philosophy.
 
By Tyrell Albin of the Lawton Constitution
 
 "To be a Great Expectations Model School is such a privilege," Woodland Hills Elementary School Principal Lisa Carson told students, parents and staff Friday afternoon, as the Woodsmen celebrated a fifth consecutive year of earning the prestigious award.
   
Great Expectations is an educational movement designed to improve schools through a focus on good character and professional development for teachers. Model School status is awarded to schools that score at least 90 percent when they are evaluated by mentors from the program, based on 17 practices characterizing the Great Expectations philosophy. Model School is the highest rank awarded by the program. Schools in Great Expectations must reapply every year to maintain their status.
   
Woodland Hills honored its success in GE with a student-led assembly that included songs and recitations highlighting how the students and teachers follow the basic concepts of Great Expectations on a daily basis.
   
ReGina Farquhar, the school’s Great Expectations mentor, was there to give Carson a plaque commemorating the school’s achievement.
   
She reminded the students that the whole purpose of GE is to help them achieve the things their parents and educators want for them.
   
"We are here for you all," Farquhar said to the kids.
   
Carson gratefully accepted the plaque.
   
"In education, we’re kind of in a tough place, there have been a lot of changes," the principal said. "It’s good to be able to celebrate the good things going on."