Practice #13

A school, class, or personal creed is recited or reflected upon daily to reaffirm commitment to excellence.

Contents include

Printable materials, Ready-to-use Strategies, and Web links in the following sections:

 

Implementation Basics

Ideas for Implementation

Implementation Evaluation and Goal Setting

Life Principle

Expectation

Quotes

Hand Signs

Practice Connections

Practice Characteristics

Evidence of Practice

Research

Literature

Vocabulary

Music & Video Links

Learning Strategies

Mind Map

Goal Setting Process with Individual and Class Forms and Examples

 

Introduction to Practice #13

A school, class, or personal creed is recited or reflected upon daily to reaffirm commitment to excellence.

The WHY? of Practice #13!

Implementation supports:

  • Changing behaviors by changing the talk creating a new productive dialogue
  • Building a common language communicating the purpose of the group
  • Focusing on goals and learning
  • Encouraging learners to listen and respond differently resulting in a respectful, encouraging environment.
  • Helping learners develop a vision and a plan to reach that vision that can transform their efforts and successes.
  • Creating a living document meant:
    • To be evaluated periodically for validity, consistency, and pertinence to current goals, values, and purpose.
    • To be reflected upon and applied daily.

Research:

  • There is evidence from the pre-school level through and including high school that character education depends in a large part on the degree to which students bond to, become attached to, or feel a part of their schools. This is also seen in the research that shows that student perceptions of school as a caring community are critical to the effectiveness of character education. Schools need to intentionally foster such bonding and to monitor its development. Students’ participation in formulating a creed or creeds and then their active adherence to their creed along with the similar dedication of their classmates and teachers will engender an impact on their lives which will last through their years of schooling and beyond. Berkowitz, M. W., and Bier, M. C. (2005). What Works in Character Education: A Research-Driven Guide for Educators. Character Education Partnership. The University of Missouri-St. Louis.
  • Discussions that help students identify their personal values and encourage knowledge, involvement, and contributions to the community build character. Feinstein, S. (2004) Secrets of the Teenage Brain, Research-Based Strategies for Reaching and Teaching Today’s Adolescents, San Diego: The Brain Store, 63.

For Research: see Rationale for 17 Practices Practice #13 – pages 28-29 on Great Expectations website.

The WHO? EVERY LEARNER!

The WHERE? EVERYWHERE learners are engaged in the instructional process.

The WHEN? - Daily use of the elements of Practice #13 will:

  • Increase the skills needed to define and communicate the characteristics of ethical behavior.
  • Declare a daily verbal commitment to a climate of respect and academic success.
  • Create a standard for attitudes and conduct by establishing core values and goals.
  • Encourage learners to use respect and integrity when interacting with others through self-reflection, problem-solving, and critical thinking.

External actions are evidence of internal beliefs.

Our deeds are what show our creeds.”

-- Tim Hiller

 

(Printable Poster)

Main objection: "This takes too much time!" Response: What are the goals for all learners?

Goals:

  • To have a clear understanding of the expectations and standards for behavior and academic performance.
  • To assist learners in declaring and applying the standards in their daily living.
  • To respect all learners and to challenge them to be good communicators by offering voice and choice in their learning.
  • To create a threat-free environment that encourages individuals to ask questions and share ideas.

The BENEFITS!

  • There is evidence from the pre-school level through and including high school that character education depends in a large part on the degree to which learners bond to, become attached to, or feel a part of their schools. This is also seen in the research that shows that learner perceptions of school as a caring community are critical to the effectiveness of character education. Schools need to intentionally foster such bonding and to monitor their development. Learners’ participation in formulating a creed or creeds and then their active adherence to their creed along with the similar dedication of their classmates and educators will engender an impact on their lives which will last through their years of schooling and beyond. Berkowitz, M.W. and Bier, M.C. (2005). What Works in Character Education: A Research-Driven Guide for Educators. Character Education Partnership. University of Missouri-St. Louis. Available online: Social and Character Development
  • In a study entitled “What Good Schools Do,” character education schools were identified. Those were schools that promote core ethical values in all phases of school life. The research suggests that goals and activities that are associated with good character education programs are also associated with academic achievement. Bennings, J.S., Berkowitz, M.W., Kuehn, P., and Smith, K. (2003). “The Relationship of Character Education Implementation and Academic Achievement in Elementary Schools,” Journal of Research in Character Education, vol. 1, 2003
  • Practice #13 supports the Personal Values, Relations with Others, and Communication Skills listed under The 8 Keys to Employability:

    Key #1:

    Personal Values

    • Honest
    • Positive self-image
    • Personal and career goals
    • Emotional stability
    • Good attitude

    Key #2: Problem-solving and Decision-making Skills

    • Creative & Innovative
    • Flexible
    • Adapt to change
    • Plan & organize work
    • Reason & make objective decisions

    Key #4: Communication Skills

    Valued Workers:

    • Ask questions and listen well
    • Express themselves clearly
    • Seek help when needed
    • Communicate with supervisor and coworkers

    Developing Employability Skills - School Improvement Research